Irish Culture & Heritage Blog

  • Ogham Series - Clann - Family

    Clann is the Irish word for family, but it can also be used to describe descendants or offspring of a family line. This is most common use of this word but in looking a little deeper into the language and exploring its other translations, maybe we can gain a deeper understanding of what family means in Irish culture.
  • The Ogham Series - Neart - Strength

    Ogham is the first written script of Ireland. Combining this ancient script with the words from the living Irish language our Ogham series hopes to bring new energy and awareness to both.

    Neart is the Irish word for Strength, but it can also be read as force or power.
  • Ogham Series - Misneach - Courage

    Misneach is the Irish word for courage. Unlike many other Irish words there does not appear to be alternative meanings to this term. The concept of courage is something that many would see as a fundamental facet of the human condition, as core to our existence as fear.
  • Ogham Series - Rath - Prosperity

    Combining this ancient script with the words from the living Irish language our Ogham series hopes to bring new energy and awareness to both.

    Rath is the Irish word for prosperity.
  • Ogham Series - Buíochus - Gratitude

    Combining this ancient script with the words from the living Irish language our Ogham series hopes to bring new energy and awareness to both.

    Buíochus is the Irish word for Gratitude.
  • Ogham Series - Sláinte - Health

    Sláinte is the Irish word for health. It speaks to a total form of well being that is not just about the physical. This term is one of the more famous Irish words that is heard time and again around the globe wherever folk gather and raise glasses in a toast. As with a lot of Irish language, there is a deeper meaning to our words.
  • The Well-Fed Does Not Understand The Lean.

    All over our world, people are starved of recognition, compassion, acceptance, and shockingly hundred of years on, basic food and water. We pride ourselves on the marvels of our modern world and its technological progressiveness, but all of these advances are still benefiting only a potion of our world and leaving the rest to suffer and struggle for their very survival.
  • Under the shelter of each other, people survive. - Sean Fhocail Series

    The Irish language is often remarked upon for it's poetic turn of phrase and that is no more obvious in the sean fhocail - or 'old words'. Sean fhocail are well known sentences that some might see as cliché, but when each one of them is considered in more than just passing, the deeper wisdom and cultural insights can be glimpsed.

    Ar scáth a chéile, a mhaireann na daoine translates as "Under the shelter of each other, people survive."
  • "A good Start is Half the work". - Tús Maith Leath Na Hoibre


    Tús Maith Leath Na Hoibre translates as "A good Start is Half the work".

    Often in our lives we fall afoul of a difficult to perceive influence which we are exposed to all of the time in our modern world. We are constantly shown how "great" a thing is in its completed state and rarely the effort that went into getting it there.
  • There Is No Prosperity Without Discipline.

    Ní Bhíonn An Rath Acht Mar A mBionn An Smacht, translates as “There Is No Prosperity Without Discipline.” I find this phrase as both a motivation and a bit of a call out, which makes me smile.
  • Sean Fhocail Series: Nuair a Bhíonn an Fíon Istigh, Bíonn an Ciall Amuigh!

    The Irish language is often remarked upon for it's poetic turn of phrase and that is no more obvious in the sean fhocail - or 'old words'. Sean fhocail are well known sentences that some might see as cliché, but when each one of them is considered in more than just passing, the deeper wisdom and cultural insights can be glimpsed.

    Nuair a Bhíonn an Fíon Istigh, Bíonn an Ciall Amuigh!
  • Níl Saoi Gan Locht - This is not a Wise Man without Flaw

    The Irish language is often remarked upon for it's poetic turn of phrase. To really appreciate how true these comments are one needs to turn to a book. Not a dictionary, in this case we mean a history book.